Ang Aming Angkan


Antonio San Diego and Ana Bernardo
09.17.2010, 01:00
Filed under: San Diego

This record of my great-great-great-great grandparents’ marriage in 1812 was taken from the Registros Matrimonios in San Pascual de Obando Parish in Bulacan, Philippines.

Transcript: “En el año del Señor de mil ochocientos y doce, en veinte y nueve de Mayo; haviendo presedido las tres denunciaciones del Santo Concilio de Trento sin resultar impedimento alguno, El Pueblo de Don Miguel Fernando con Lizardo del [...].  Cura de este Parroquioa del Pueblo de Obando solemnizo el matrimonio [...] Antonio de San Diego, soltero, hijo de Roque de San Diego, y de Ana Bernardo, naturales y residentes de este Pueblo del Barrio de Don Juan Martin; y Dorothea Candida, dalaga, hija de Don Juan Candida y de Doña Maria de la Concepcion, assim[...] naturales y residentes de este [...] Pueblo del Barrio de Don Victorino de Mendoza; Los quales expresaron su mutuo consentimiento ante mi, y los testigos que fueron Don Teodoro Avendaño y Santiago Evangelista inmediatamente recivieron los bendiciones nupciales y to firme – Fr. Casimiro [...]“

Translation:  “In the year of our Lord eighteen hundred and twelve, on the 29th of May, having presided over three condemnations of the Holy Council of Trent;  having found no impediments in the District of Don Miguel Fernando with Lizardo del [...].  The parish priest of this town of Obando solemnizes [...] the marriage of Antonio de San Diego, bachelor, son of Roque de San Diego, and Ana Bernardo, natural (parents) and residents of this town of the District of Don Juan Martin; and Dorothea Candida, spinster, daughter of Don Juan Candida and Doña Maria de la Concepcion, assim[...] natural (parents) and residents of this [...] town of the District of Don Victorino de Mendoza who expressed their mutual consent before me, and witnessed by Don Teodoro Avendaño and Santiago Evangelista, immediately received the nuptial blessings and signed – Fr. Casimiro [...]“

My thoughts …

1. This record takes me back one more generation and defines the names of two sets of my great-great-great-great-great grand parents, Roque de San Diego and Ana Bernardo, on one side, and Juan Candida and Maria de la Concepcion on another.

2. What is the abbreviated term that precedes “naturales” (assim[...]) and describes the relationship between the bride and her parents?  It is the first time I have come across this term.  Typical descriptions would be “naturales” or natural parents, and “legitimos” or parents from a legitimate marriage.  Some Philippine towns are more rigid about defining this, while others are not.

3. Why did the bride’s parents carry the titles of Don and Doña; while the groom’s parents did not?  In colonial Philippines, these titles were honorific in nature, automatically attached to individuals of significant distinction in the community, rather than reserved for those of  noble birth.  It would be interesting to know how the Candida Family attained their social stature — perhaps that will be key to sourcing where the wealth of the later San Diego generations were rooted.

4. Where did these families live?  Typical of the practice of the times, where the couple and their parents lived are described in the document, not in actual street names; but by the name of their cabezas del barrio or barrio captains.  I would need more information before I could plot this out in a map.

5. Note the use of abbreviations in this record.  I am not certain if these are considered standard clerical shorthand of the times or if these are unique to the person who wrote the record.  Nonetheless, similar abbreviations can be found in the volume set from which this record was lifted.

Family History Research Notes

1.  San Pascual Baylon Parish Registros Parroquiales 1754-1951, Matrimonios 1810-1852.  Microfilm Number 1128241.  CLDS Family History Center: Quezon City.  Date accessed: 03 December 2005.

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4 Comments so far
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Mona: This is my translation of the document presented:

Translation: “In the year of our Lord eighteen hundred and twelve, on the 29th of May, having presided over the three condemnations of the Holy Council of Trent without resulting in any impediment whatsoever, in the District of Don Miguel Fernando with Lizardo del [...]. The parish priest of this town of Obando solemnized [...] the marriage of Antonio de San Diego, bachelor, son of Roque de San Diego, and Ana Bernardo, natives and residents of this town of the District of Don Juan Martin; and Dorothea Candida, spinster, daughter of Don Juan Candida and Doña Maria de la Concepcion, also[...] natives and residents of this [...] town of the District of Don Victorino de Mendoza who have expressed their mutual consent before me, and before the witnesses Don Teodoro Avendaño and Santiago Evangelista, immediately received the nuptial blessings and I signed ( or could be “and signed by me”)– Fr. Casimiro [...]“

On question #2: “naturales” as used here means natives; it is followed by “y residentes” so the translation would be “natives and residents” of a place (born and resides in the same place).

Assim: as used here could mean the spanish words “asi mismo” which is the same as “tambien” (Eng: also). This is not a standard Spanish abbreviation. It could be the scribe’s own style; it does not describe any relationships but merely states that the parents are also natives and residents of a particular place. The titles Don and Dona during the Spanish colonial times were reserved for those who have achieved certain social status either economic, education or position in government. It was also reserved to peninsular Spaniards.

As to where the families lived, the key is in the document itself: Obviously, the town is Obando; the district of Don Fernando could be where the parish church is located (place of marriage). The groom’s family lived in the district of Don Juan Martin and the bride’s, in the district of Don Victorino de Mendoza. Have to find out what barrios comprised each district.

Lastly in the Spanish document I cannot make out whether it says LO FIRMO or LO FIRME. “Lo firmo” means “I signed” or could also mean “signed by me” followed by the signer’s name. “Lo firme” means “signed by” followed by the name of whoever signed the document.

In the document with this response, I inserted some of the changes discussed here.

Regards – Galo

Comment by galo calleja centenera

Appreciate the help, Kuya Galo! :)

Comment by Mona Magno-Veluz

Hello, my is Romy San Diego I live in California, USA. I am interested about your Family ancestry in the Philippines, and coincidentally we have same Family last name, and my Dad was born on the same town of Obando, Bulacan in 1903, and i believe his older was born 1880’s. please keep me inform.

Comment by Romy San Diego

Nice to meet you, Romy! I have not had the opportunity to do library research in a while; but I publish new findings on this blog; so just watch this space. I would suggest that you plot what you know of your family tree on on-line services like Geni.com. It helps find other researchers who may have come across your ancestors in their work. All the best!

Comment by Mona




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